Biking Chile

I am getting sent to Santiago, Chile for work, and am seriously considering taking my baby with me. Does anyone have any information about biking there? Forums, links, personal advice, anything…

I can’t answer your questions, but I say DO IT and take lots of pictures and have a daily blog about it.

yeah for sure
go on adventures (on your tarck) and show us how beautiful chile is

if you go, hang out with this guy:

http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/2008/ju ... ncibia.htm

hell yes.

I recommend searching and asking in the bikeforums.net Touring subforum. Lot of experience there and I remember some threads about touring with babies and children. Good luck.

i think by baby he was referring to his bike…

i went to peru a few years ago. fucking amazing. take every opportunity you can get. i dont know your setup, and i dont know santiago, but i’m assuming that if you venture outside of the city you will run into some pretty bad roads and a lot of cobblestones so be prepared for that.

otherwise, hell yeah and have a blast

Sweet! Thanks. For info: I ride an IRO steel frame and run 48/17. I’m thinking of mostly riding it around the city to commute and play during the week, and taking it on some adventures further south on some weekends.

Does anyone have advice for taking it on the plane?

http://santiago.en.craigslist.org/trv/748142115.html

Bike Tours in Santiago, Chile - La Bicicleta Verde - Urban Experiences (Santiago Chile)
Reply to: serv-748142115@craigslist.org
Date: 2008-07-09, 10:31AM CLT

La Bicicleta Verde
The One & Only City Bike Tour

The Concept:
La Bicicleta Verde offers city tours on a daily basis around Santiago, Chile, an ideal city for bicycle tourism due to its location in a valley with a splendid Mediterranean climate & less than 15 days of rain a year. Santiago, a city full of cultural & urban contrasts, lies in a green valley with modern skyscrapers that cannot quite reach the overarching &es in the backdrop.

Our idea is simple: cover Santiago’s urban lanscape as an insider, assuring an entertaining & safe journey on two wheels throughout the nation’s capitol. Our routes are previously mapped out & expert guides lead all of our outings.

Our city tours are more than just simple bike routes. Weaving in & out of the tiny streets & alleys of Santiago, our bilingual guides will be sure to stop along the journey at all the biggest historical, political & cultural corners, all which are neatly tucked into the unique cycling routes. Each & every turn on our 1970-style green beach cruiser bikes will help you experience the daily life of the typical Chilean living in the nation’s capital.

Beyond great laughs & green bikes, our morning tour at 9:30 a.m. & afternoon tour at 2:30 p.m. each offer a different angle on seeing the city. Our relaxing sunset tour starts at 18:30 p.m. & travels down Santiago’s central river Mapocho, all the way from the upper east side of modern Vitacura to the hip bohemian Bella Vista neighborhood. Three daily tour experiences allow any of our visitors to feel Santiago from the inside out while pedaling through our city of rich contrasts of urban & green hilltops.

While all of our tours provide insight into Chile’s idiosyncrasy, each tour travels down different parks, avenues & historical experiences. Thematic tours are our specialty & satisfaction is our goal. Because we are confident enough that you will enjoy yourself, every tour is 100% satisfaction guaranteed.


MORNING TOUR

Tours on Two Wheels:
The best way to experience Santiago

Locals´ Life & La Chimba Tour

Morning Experience - 9:30 am – 12: 30 pm

Where idiosyncrasy meets the hustle & bustle of the daily local’s life. Fresh fruit markets & local produce, graffiti & religious vigor, amongst other often-overlooked lively details, are the focus of this energizing tour. This tour will not explain the Chilean culture to you, rather it will attempt to help you experience it & delve into what would be a typical day for the average citizen living in our nation’s capitol.

$15.000 Chilean Pesos

Availability: Everyday of the year.
Minimum size: 1
Maximum size: none
Physical difficulty: minimal
Technical difficulty: minimal


AFTERNOON TOUR

Parks & Politics Tour
Afternoon Experience - 2:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Where idiosyncrasy meets Chile’s unique & isolated political & cultural history. Overwhelming long parks & gentle strolls help initiate this afternoon tour before diving into General Pinochet´s notorious 1973 political coup & its aftereffects. It would be an understatement to say this tour helps connect old Chile to modern Chile, as we know it today.

$15.000 Chilean Pesos

Availability: Everyday of the year.
Minimum size: 1
Maximum size: none
Physical difficulty: minimal
Technical difficulty: minimal

------EVENING BIKE TOUR--------
The Sunset River Mapocho Tour
Evening Experience: 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

La Bicicleta Verde goes against - both literally & figuratively - the traffic on its regular evening bike outing starting at 6:30 p.m.

From the outskirts of uptown beautiful Las Condes & Vitacura, we lead small & large groups (up to 25) up through Las Condes, El Golf, Providencia & several of the “parques” that stretch over 10 kilometers through Santiago’s east side. We are sure to hit the ambitious Bicentennial Park Project for Chile’s 200-year anniversary.

To call it relaxing would be an understatement. Considering there are traffic jams throughout Santiago in the evening, riding a green bike – instead of sitting in a car – down the easy parks & safest avenues of Santiago is refreshing. We stop every 20 to 30 minutes to rest & converse about Santiago’s under-appreciated upper side. Pedaling by astonishing churches, skyscrapers & Santiago’s modern mix of architecture & green parks makes this outing a cannot-miss. Our tour slows down for one of Santiago best hole-in-the-wall bars for pisco sours, cold brews, & hunger-quenching snacks. This route is 100% easy-downhill & 100% extreme-relaxing, meaning one could almost finish the entire route without touching their pedals: rather, just sit back & enjoy the atmosphere.

1 person: $30.000 CLP

Availability: Everyday of the year.
Minimum size: 1
Maximum size: none
Physical difficulty: minimal
Technical difficulty: medium

----MONTHLY MASSIVE BIKE OUTINGS ------
Tours on Two Wheels:
The best way to experience Santiago
Santiago’s Monthly Cyclist Outing
Massive Cycling Movement Experience: 8-10 p.m.

The first Tuesday of every month at 8 p.m., Santiago is overtaken by a massive swarm of hundreds of joyous cyclists, who take to the streets to promote the use of the bicycle. This event, organized by a number of closely working cycle activists, consists of a great outing every four weeks. The route is decided upon in a democratic fashion, via the online forum at the Furious Bikers Movement in Chile, where future participants vote on their preference for each & every month. Not only is the route easy & enjoyable, the Chilean police stop their work in the evening to stop & block traffic so hundreds of cyclists can show off their latest bell, helmet, or leg muscles.

Single-speeds, tricycles & recumbent rides, choppers, baby seats & double suspensions can all be found throughout the ride. All rides include a bucket full of laughs.

La Bicicleta Verde organizes every month an outing for groups & individuals, both foreigners & locals, to join us on this experience. We ride together on green bikes, chat along the way at a comfortable rate, & end the evening with some beers in a local dive. Your bilingual guide will accompany you the entire route to ensure you enjoy your ride & of course have a safe one.

Come alone or come many, but don’t forget to come.

Upcoming dates:
· August 5th – September 2nd – October 7th

Evening Outing 8pm-10pm
1 person: $20.000 CLP

Availability: Everyday of the year.
Minimum size: 1
Maximum size: none
Physical difficulty: minimal

YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION AND VIDEOS ON YOUTUBE AT http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzJm_bcw … videos.php

OR ON OUR WEBPAGE AT http://www.labicicletaverde.com/

Feel free to call us from Chile or the USA, and our contact information can be found on our webpage.

* Location: Santiago Chile
* it's NOT ok to contact this poster with services or other commercial interests

PostingID: 748142115

Get a nashbar bike bag.

I got a bike box from an LBS, then removed the handlebars, seatpost, deflated the tires, and packed in the tools and some of my camping stuff for padding.

I really hope you aren’t planning on touring ss/fg. I toured on a road bike with a triple and when biking around Jersey w/o gear I refused to ever use the lowest ring, wouldn’t think of it. No matter what hill I encountered I was always able to power up it without resorting to the third ring. But let me tell you, once I had 50lbs of gear strapped to my bike I was spending most of my time in the little ring and even the granny gear just to get up some mountains. And I even had to walk my bike a bit in the Ozarks. So I really don’t recommend touring on a bike without some really low gears.

I did it, brought the bike on the company dime, and have absolutely loved having her here. If anyone is interested I thought of posting a little more about the experience, maybe a pic.

My problem, however:
I hear a scary creaking sound from my bb when I step on my right crank. I’ve tightened it as much as I can, and am a little worried about over-tighteneing it. Is this indicative of something I did wrong putting it back together? I’m hesitant to take it to a shop here since fixed gears are super rare here, worried they might know less than me about what to do. Any hints out there would be awesome.

Fixed gears are like any other bike, but more simple. Just take it in. I’m guessing your bearings are grinding in there. Hopefully you just need a new sealed square taper BB

[quote=“vegwerm”]I did it, brought the bike on the company dime, and have absolutely loved having her here. If anyone is interested I thought of posting a little more about the experience, maybe a pic.

My problem, however:
I hear a scary creaking sound from my bb when I step on my right crank. I’ve tightened it as much as I can, and am a little worried about over-tighteneing it. Is this indicative of something I did wrong putting it back together? I’m hesitant to take it to a shop here since fixed gears are super rare here, worried they might know less than me about what to do. Any hints out there would be awesome.[/quote]

Did you check the chainring bolts too?

No, haven’t checked the chainring bolts. Will do that straight after work. I’ve had some companeros recommend a good shop, so I’m taking her there to have them check er out too.

Check the pedals as well and stem/bar interface. This one may sound counter intuitive, but I would also check the saddle/post. Squeaks can telegraph in funny ways.

Cheers Tarckeemoon, loose chainring bolts. Thanks

So, I’ve been here for a month, and have loved every pedal stroke. I am always amazed at how many parts of my life are enriched by riding, not to mention riding my favorite machine. I live in a very upscale modern area of Santiago, Las Condes, filled with highrise apartment and office buildings, and plenty of quicos (snobs); lack of culture is the price we pay for globalization. I love being faster than public transportation, and smoking through tacos (traffic jams) while people look at me like a gringo alien. Mostly it’s just an office job in a big city, I just happen to speak Spanish all day. The city is flat, easy to avoid major thoroughfares, and most streets just beg to be taken advantage of. Chileans do ride bikes, but mostly cheap Chinese knockoffs of crappy mountain bikes, and at a snails pace. It is at the foot of the Andes, so there is the serious mountain bike crowd around, but I’ve only seen one fixy besides mine so far. Drivers are usually a little surprised, and sometimes offended to see me in traffic, especially cab drivers. And Chileans are exceptionally terrible drivers, so there are more than enough obstacles to keep me focused. I ride decently aggressively, and have found ways to get around efficiently the places I go frequently. Santiago has a lot of new ciclovias (bikepaths), especially in this part of town, and tons of divided boulevards with a park and big dirt path down the middle. You can get anywhere through the network of parks and a few side streets. A cross bike or a hardtail would be a lot of fun here as well I think. Most roads are bumpy, but hey, that’s why I ride a steel frame. I carry a u lock and a big steel cable to go through the rear wheel as well, and given the huge theft culture here I try not to let her too far out of my sight. My commute to and from work every day keeps me sane.

Thanks for all the encouragement from everyone who told me to bring the bike. I’m new to this forum, have already learned a ton, and look forward to more fun.