fixing my HED3c

so i hit a pothole while i was riding around with some friends last week.
flatted my rear, and put a little crack in my hed3
i peeled back the tire a little bit and realized that under the tire isnt damaged at all.
so i decided to repaire it myself.

i just put a dab of resin on it, then wax paper and a little peice of wood taped down really tight

ill take photos after its dry and when i sand it

we’ll see if this was a good idea

if you’re serious your a jackass.
Either way I’m laughing a+ posting.

first oh no, now dutret?

who is this guy?

i call sock puppet

Seems reasonable.

700 x HED3c?

new tire size?

Crabone?

[quote=dutret]if you’re serious your a jackass.
Either way I’m laughing a+ posting.[/quote]

Fixing carbon fiber isn’t voodoo. It’s relatively easy to repair and reinforce small spots if you’re careful and use the right materials.

I used to think there was no reason to ride a carbon fiber tubular on a regular ride, but now that I have Zipps (really, really old ones), I find myself using them more often and in ways I never thought I would. It’s probably jackass, though.

If it is your front wheel I would have someone that knows what they are doing look at it.

OMG, YOU’RE GONNA DIE!

After recently having a discussion with the folks at True Temper (Alpha Q) about some CF business, I’d say that if you have half a clue, examining it yourself and exercising your own critical thinking abilities probably lends itself better to mitigating the perceived risk.

This. It’s a composite, not magic. I’d be most concerned about the epoxy used, curing temps and times, etc.

you’re gonna dye

googled it for you sol

just put some elmers on it.


invest.

[quote=bonechilling]
Fixing carbon fiber isn’t voodoo. It’s relatively easy to repair and reinforce small spots if you’re careful and use the right materials.[/quote]

I have no problem with fixing cf. This wasn’t done right anyway though. The strength isn’t in the epoxy it’s in the fiber. When fixing structural elements rather then just sealing non-structural parts you need to add more fiber over the crack.

There is a difference between old 40mm zipps on your road bike, which still doesn’t make much sense, and a hed3c on a tarck bike. Either way I don’t see the point of riding around on wheels that won’t brake well but are easier to break and expensive to fix if they do.

[quote=Mr. Pink]

googled it for you sol[/quote]
thx mang

this

[quote=bonechilling][quote=dutret]if you’re serious your a jackass.
Either way I’m laughing a+ posting.[/quote]

Fixing carbon fiber isn’t voodoo. It’s relatively easy to repair and reinforce small spots if you’re careful and use the right materials.

I used to think there was no reason to ride a carbon fiber tubular on a regular ride, but now that I have Zipps (really, really old ones), I find myself using them more often and in ways I never thought I would. It’s probably jackass, though.[/quote]
I was keeping low profile with my unpopular choices, still I am riding tubulars exclusively, and more and more of my rides have older (tougher) Zipps - especially Pave versions which are sturdier. God bless roadies with OC upgrading - older wheels are not that expensive on FleaBay.

Yeah, a coworker picked up some Zipp 340s with Dura Ace hubs on eBay for $220. Of course, they weigh more than a pair of Ksyrium Elites, but they’re still carbon and hence are “high zoot.”

I have paid about this for mine NOS rims. 810 grams for a rear inclusive of rather heavy tubular and bolts is not that bad.