How many of these people will even own bikes in 5 years?

?

that hat is a prop. in a big way.

exactly five, two of them will share a tandem, one will still own one but it will be sitting in a garage with flat tires ,two will still be riding a bike but only one will ride a tarkbike

i know for sure i won’t be ridding tarck bikes in 5 years. i’m just riding this wave until it dies.

most of us will probably be riding recumbent trikes in the next few years anyways…taht is teh futures!

Standout moments for me: when he lists his reasons for doing this book…“my friends ride these crazy bikes…and there are no gears, which is you know, aesthetically pleasing” - holy shit. right now in this room only 1 THING has gears!!! I am sitting in a GOLD MINE of aestheticism!!!

And also, the girl at 2:51, in the checkered hoodie, when the photographer holds the bike up for her and she gives him this look like “what the fuck is this?”

awesome.

Ugh, I know one of them (the guy with the blue hat at the very beginning). As far as I know, he’s never shown an interest in bicycles before recently.

Oh and I have no idea what he’s saying cause I don’t have any sound.

Just my own observations, the people in it for all fashion and no passion fade out after about 2 years… they move on to non-fixed bikes, or cars. I’ve seen this with 3 or 4 friends so far.

OK so this “fad” is a good thing then! If you look at it from the point of view that there will be an abundance of cheap frames and parts on the market

The answer is “very few.” I think that, with shit like this, the trend is about to reach the Gladwell-esque “tipping point.”

My prediction, and I’m not alone in this, is that cyclocross will be the next wave. I don’t think we’ll see as many people racing as we do popping killer wheelie barspins now, but I bet that culture vultures like Prolly will jump ship and pretty soon their “new love” will be their custom steel cyclocross bikes. I’m talking like… by fall.

“see ya on the cover hopefully”

“uhh… . (wtf?). .”

Based on the way that so many parts are seemingly abused doing “tricks,” I wouldn’t expect a whole lot to survive in usable condition. Lugged steel track frames were not intended to be wheelied on, much less carbon fiber tri-spokes.

OK so this “fad” is a good thing then! If you look at it from the point of view that there will be an abundance of cheap frames and parts on the market[/quote]

You could put it that way, there’s still a good deal of people that are genuinely into bikes and fixed gears. They may even be labeled the H word.

People always try to say hipsterism is a fad too but it’s been going on since the early to mid 90’s. From what I know, fixed gears on the streets in the major metropolitans being ridden by people other than messengers and old timers started to gain momentum somewhere in the 1999 area. It’s taken this long to build up but things are just going to keep getting bigger and bigger.

Trendiness is much much older than that.

[quote=“bonechilling”]The answer is “very few.” I think that, with shit like this, the trend is about to reach the Gladwell-esque “tipping point.”

My prediction, and I’m not alone in this, is that cyclocross will be the next wave. I don’t think we’ll see as many people racing as we do popping killer wheelie barspinz now, but I bet that culture vultures like Prolly will jump ship and pretty soon their “new love” will be their custom steel cyclocross bikes. I’m talking like… by fall.[/quote]

I’m still calling vintage classic steel, think old Masis full Campy, or old Japanese frame full Suntour. Maybe even some anachronistic crossover, like riding a HED3 on some vintage road bike. The people I’ve seen give up fixed but still retain an interest in biking seem to go this route.

Trendiness is much much older than that.[/quote]

You know what I mean though. Trendiness in this form.

soooooo i got hit by a caaaaaar this summmmmerrrrrr

christ

also breaking news these bikes HAVE NO GEARS

Read this article, replace “Hush Puppies” with “fixed gear bikes,” and that should give you an accurate idea of where this trend came from and is going.

That video made me sad.

wow. ya know, i’m all for people getting into bikes and riding. but wow. i don’t know why i get so irritated when i see this “fashion” cycling stuff. i’ll admit, i got into fixed gears after they got popular; same as most everyone else who wasn’t already track racing. but does it ever seem that the majority of the attention goes to people who take it to the extreme? and does that make you feel like a tool as well, in that you may in some aspect be lumped in with the jokers?

less than a third of those people will be riding in 5 years i bet. a few will genuinely love riding (and may move to cross racing, since i think bonechilling has been making a good point for a while now), but most of those bikes will either get sold, or find a spot in the corner and collect dust, as a trophy that the riders “were there.”

i will be honest though; getting into fixed gear riding a while back really got me more interested in cycling in general. i was always a casual cyclist, keeping bikes around, but not really knowing much about them, and certainly not relying on them. i think it was a combination of excitement about riding fixed combined with my decision to live car free last summer that spurned me to actually care more about what i was doing. not to say that i’m SERIOUS CYCLIST PERSON JIM, but you know.

but don’t worry tarck, i’ll be here (until prolly gives the all-clear on cyclocross!)

i gotta say though, all of those girls we cute. brunettes? bikes? win.

Read this article, replace “Hush Puppies” with “fixed gear bikes,” and that should give you an accurate idea of where this trend came from and is going.[/quote]

Really interesting article, thanks for posting that. At this point I’d say most of the people starting to ride fixed gears are somewhere between “early” and “late adopters” on the spectrum… maybe full on “late adopters” seeing as it’s moving out of major metros and into college towns and suburbs. Most of the people in the video are riding on the trends of the “innovators” - we saw Jovantae Turner riding rear Aerospokes years ago, dudes doing HED3’s on the street years ago, all these trends are years old by now and nothing new…

Totally makes sense as far as fixed gears blowing up though. I think I could trace the whole trend in a few lines: messengers in NYC adopting track bikes as their work bikes in the 70’s and 80’s for various reasons that everyone is probably already familar with → track bikes spreading to other cities via the CMWC in the 90’s, including SF → innovators/early adopters hanging out in the same urban areas that messengers work, seeing the inherent “coolness” of track bikes and adopting them → more early adopts pouring in = trickling down from bigger cities like NYC, SF and LA to more midsized metros → mainstreamization setting in, corporate America taking notice, things progressing to the burbs/college towns.

I can’t believe I just typed that out. Someone put that in Wikipedia…