Installing cork grips

This is an extra thing you would have to buy but I think rubber cement might work, it’s worked on all the track grips I’ve put on.

how hard is it to remove them if you ever decide to replace them?

Fail. Time to go get some spray adhesive.

Gasoline will melt the rubber a bit and glue them on to the bars. It’ll be a fuckin mess getting 'em off though.

edit: you said cork. . .

Regarding the 190 proof shit. Fractional distillation is used to get to 191, which is waaaaaay more effective than trying to freeze the water away. Dessicants can be used to remove the remainder, but are typically harsh chemicals such as benzene.

***hehe. I looked this up before I hit submit

[quote=“wikipedia”]Ethylene hydration or brewing produces an ethanol–water mixture. For most industrial and fuel uses, the ethanol must be purified. Fractional distillation can concentrate ethanol to 95.6% by weight (89.5 mole%). This mixture is an azeotrope with a boiling point of 78.1 °C, and cannot be further purified by distillation.

In one common industrial method to obtain absolute alcohol, a small quantity of benzene is added to rectified spirit and the mixture is then distilled. Absolute alcohol is obtained in the third fraction, which distills over at 78.3 °C (351.4 K).[10] Because a small amount of the benzene used remains in the solution, absolute alcohol produced by this method is not suitable for consumption, as benzene is carcinogenic.[35]

There is also an absolute alcohol production process by desiccation using glycerol. Alcohol produced by this method is known as spectroscopic alcohol — so called because the absence of benzene makes it suitable as a solvent in spectroscopy.

Other methods for obtaining absolute ethanol include desiccation using adsorbents such as starch or zeolites, which adsorb water preferentially, as well as azeotropic distillation and extractive distillation.[/quote]

Here’s a few more techniques, but they all appear to be some form of dehydrating the water aside from the “pressure reduction fractional distillation” which sounds like one bitch of a setup.
Fractional distillation requires a heat source and circulating water

:removes tape from glasses:

[quote=“peedtm”]Gasoline will melt the rubber a bit and glue them on to the bars. It’ll be a fuckin mess getting 'em off though.

edit: you said cork. . .

Regarding the 190 proof shit. Fractional distillation is used to get to 191, which is waaaaaay more effective than trying to freeze the water away. Dessicants can be used to remove the remainder, but are typically harsh chemicals such as benzene.

***hehe. I looked this up before I hit submit

[quote=“wikipedia”]Ethylene hydration or brewing produces an ethanol–water mixture. For most industrial and fuel uses, the ethanol must be purified. Fractional distillation can concentrate ethanol to 95.6% by weight (89.5 mole%). This mixture is an azeotrope with a boiling point of 78.1 °C, and cannot be further purified by distillation.

In one common industrial method to obtain absolute alcohol, a small quantity of benzene is added to rectified spirit and the mixture is then distilled. Absolute alcohol is obtained in the third fraction, which distills over at 78.3 °C (351.4 K).[10] Because a small amount of the benzene used remains in the solution, absolute alcohol produced by this method is not suitable for consumption, as benzene is carcinogenic.[35]

There is also an absolute alcohol production process by desiccation using glycerol. Alcohol produced by this method is known as spectroscopic alcohol — so called because the absence of benzene makes it suitable as a solvent in spectroscopy.

Other methods for obtaining absolute ethanol include desiccation using adsorbents such as starch or zeolites, which adsorb water preferentially, as well as azeotropic distillation and extractive distillation.[/quote]

Here’s a few more techniques, but they all appear to be some form of dehydrating the water aside from the “pressure reduction fractional distillation” which sounds like one bitch of a setup.
Fractional distillation requires a heat source and circulating water

:removes tape from glasses:[/quote]
oh my god your icon makes so much sense now.

Use semen.
Or Elmer’s spray glue.

My bad, I was thinking of the ethanol at work which says it’s at some crazy percentage (just barely under 100%). And yeah it is a complete bitch of a set up to make it, which is why it’s crazy expensive and I almost feel bad wasting it sometimes for entirely personal uses.

[quote=“bold”][quote=“peedtm”]Gasoline will melt the rubber a bit and glue them on to the bars. It’ll be a fuckin mess getting 'em off though.

edit: you said cork. . .

Regarding the 190 proof shit. Fractional distillation is used to get to 191, which is waaaaaay more effective than trying to freeze the water away. Dessicants can be used to remove the remainder, but are typically harsh chemicals such as benzene.

***hehe. I looked this up before I hit submit

[quote=“wikipedia”]Ethylene hydration or brewing produces an ethanol–water mixture. For most industrial and fuel uses, the ethanol must be purified. Fractional distillation can concentrate ethanol to 95.6% by weight (89.5 mole%). This mixture is an azeotrope with a boiling point of 78.1 °C, and cannot be further purified by distillation.

In one common industrial method to obtain absolute alcohol, a small quantity of benzene is added to rectified spirit and the mixture is then distilled. Absolute alcohol is obtained in the third fraction, which distills over at 78.3 °C (351.4 K).[10] Because a small amount of the benzene used remains in the solution, absolute alcohol produced by this method is not suitable for consumption, as benzene is carcinogenic.[35]

There is also an absolute alcohol production process by desiccation using glycerol. Alcohol produced by this method is known as spectroscopic alcohol — so called because the absence of benzene makes it suitable as a solvent in spectroscopy.

Other methods for obtaining absolute ethanol include desiccation using adsorbents such as starch or zeolites, which adsorb water preferentially, as well as azeotropic distillation and extractive distillation.[/quote]

Here’s a few more techniques, but they all appear to be some form of dehydrating the water aside from the “pressure reduction fractional distillation” which sounds like one bitch of a setup.
Fractional distillation requires a heat source and circulating water

:removes tape from glasses:[/quote]
oh my god your icon makes so much sense now.[/quote]

GOOD NEWS EVERYONE!

HEY!!! As I said earlier:

YOU PUT SOME CLOTH BAR TAPE UNDERNEATH!!! PROBLEM SOLVED!!!

Just use one strip covering the bar end and following the line of the bars on both sides, that way it will stay in place while you slide the cork grip over the top. Works a treat!

Then you can also take them off if you ever want to and not have glue residue everywhere.