SHARTQ'S


#44921

[quote=Recumbentist][quote=motorbacon][quote=Recumbentist]My information comes from a well-known frame/wheelbuilder…someone who they would presumably want to be associated with. He says they are tough to order from by any means.

I’m going to make the effort to get some, but it sounds like some of you have actually ridden them? How are they? Has anyone tried them on a road biek?[/quote]

Have this ‘builder’ aka Rob English call them. If not, I’ll call them for you.

They are worth buying. The bearing quality and overall build quality puts all of the MUSA brands to shame. The engagement is instant and somewhat ‘soft’ in feel because you’re accustomed to a hard engagement of a pawl/ratchet mechanism.

Here’s a quick video comparing a ‘fast hub’ with the Onyx. The Onyx simply doesn’t slow down due to drag and having ridden the bike in the parking lot it’s noticeable.

No, not Rob. But you do realize that I didn’t use a name deliberately, right?[/quote]

Yep. Just tired of the bike industry today.


#44922

DQ:. What size BB do I get to replace the cup-cone one on my '84 mtb with a triple? I need the width and spindle length.


#44923

Probably 68x118 but you’ll need to measure


#44924

[quote=Recumbentist][quote=eric_ssucks]As someone who has done customer support for an bicycle equipment manufacturer: if you’re a shop, call first, call often. If they don’t answer, call again.

Emails are important, but business hours and email received rates do not often align and a ringing phone is always more important than the 30th email response that day.[/quote]

Why why why are bicycle-based businesses often so incompetent at, you know, business?[/quote]
Because loving bikes and being good at business are unrelated traits.


#44925

[quote=Recumbentist][quote=eric_ssucks]As someone who has done customer support for an bicycle equipment manufacturer: if you’re a shop, call first, call often. If they don’t answer, call again.

Emails are important, but business hours and email received rates do not often align and a ringing phone is always more important than the 30th email response that day.[/quote]

Why why why are bicycle-based businesses often so incompetent at, you know, business?[/quote]

Because people who are good at business tend to work in areas where they can get a reasonable paycheck.

No money in bikes means enthusiasm is valued over competence.


#44926

No one needs to even be explaining this still.


#44927

[quote=motorbacon]

That video makes the Onyx hubs very tempting. It would be awesome to not have any noise when freewheeling.

Also, is this how you blow out a carbon clincher? I rode down this ridiculous thing on yesterday’s ride.


#44928

Hey internet fit advice gurus: I am getting upper back pain on rides of >2 hours now. I think part of it is because I was off the bike because of the neck injury for almost 18 months and my upper body is weak–in fact there was a point where my left triceps was so paralyzed from the nerve injury that I couldn’t pull a shirt over my head, although that appears to have gotten much better. What’s the best solution in terms of exercises and fit?

I think part of the issue might be that I am putting way too much weight on my hands. I’ve been messing around with a lot of different saddles and fit within the limits of my bike and my neck, upper, and lower back, trying to balance them so that there is the least amount of pain across the board. So what’s the best way to get weight off the hands/arms in terms of fit? Tilt the saddle back, slide it forward or back?

Another part of the issue is that I’m trying to address multiple parameters. My lower back wants to be long and very low…but my neck won’t tolerate that. And then there’s the hand pressure/upper back issue.

Also just want to note that the upper back pain issue appeared when I switched saddles from an Ergon to a Berthoud swallow-like saddle that I had sitting around…but it’s difficult to sort out because I’ve also been dramatically increasing my mileage at the same time.


#44929

So, think of your upper body as being cantilevered off your lower body. Reducing hand pressure is done by moving the saddle back and down a little. And maybe moving the bars forward and down.

Also, holy shit yoga, pilates, PiYo™, squats anything to build up core strength helps immensely.


#44930

[quote=eric_ssucks]So, think of your upper body as being cantilevered off your lower body. Reducing hand pressure is done by moving the saddle back and down a little. And maybe moving the bars forward and down.

Also, holy shit yoga, pilates, PiYo™, squats anything to build up core strength helps immensely.[/quote]

I’d mess with bar position long before I’d try to address upper body issues with saddle position.

I have found yoga tremendously useful in strengthening my core and in making me more aware of postural issues while riding.

Anecdotally, I’ve found that usually either my triceps get sore or my neck / upper back gets sore, but not both at the same time. I don’t have the kinesiology background to explain it, but maybe there’s something about how one positions one’s shoulders and elbows that might help.


#44931

[quote=iwillbe][quote=eric_ssucks]So, think of your upper body as being cantilevered off your lower body. Reducing hand pressure is done by moving the saddle back and down a little. And maybe moving the bars forward and down.

Also, holy shit yoga, pilates, PiYo™, squats anything to build up core strength helps immensely.[/quote]

I’d mess with bar position long before I’d try to address upper body issues with saddle position.[/quote]

I respectfully disagree. Moving the saddle does the most with the body’s center of mass, and so imo is the place to start when weight is distributed where it isn’t wanted. I have found that moving my hands a cm or two has effects proportional to moving the saddle by millimeters.

so yeah, tilted back, lowered and moved back is a good idea if upper body has been a problem.

also, planks are great for back pain issues related to cycling.


#44932

[quote=eric_ssucks]So, think of your upper body as being cantilevered off your lower body. Reducing hand pressure is done by moving the saddle back and down a little. And maybe moving the bars forward and down.

Also, holy shit yoga, pilates, PiYo™, squats anything to build up core strength helps immensely.[/quote]

My problem with all of those is that I am, literally, terrified of upper-body exercises because of the risk of injuring my neck again. I don’t think I ever adequately expressed how fucked up it was…like I couldn’t even sit at a desk for longer than 20 minutes, and I also had to take a fuck ton of hydrocodone just to get minimal function.

I know that’s not a good answer, I’m just going to have to force myself to do the upper body exercises slowly and progressively.

Going for a “fit” ride in a moment–the kind where you stop every 5 minutes to adjust something. Going to work on moving the saddle around some more and try yet another saddle. Of course since the problem doesn’t start showing up until about the 2-hour mark it’s going to be difficult to tell if I’m making improvements.


#44933

[quote=mander][quote=iwillbe][quote=eric_ssucks]So, think of your upper body as being cantilevered off your lower body. Reducing hand pressure is done by moving the saddle back and down a little. And maybe moving the bars forward and down.

Also, holy shit yoga, pilates, PiYo™, squats anything to build up core strength helps immensely.[/quote]

I’d mess with bar position long before I’d try to address upper body issues with saddle position.[/quote]

I respectfully disagree. Moving the saddle does the most with the body’s center of mass, and so imo is the place to start when weight is distributed where it isn’t wanted. I have found that moving my hands a cm or two has effects proportional to moving the saddle by millimeters.

so yeah, tilted back, lowered and moved back is a good idea if upper body has been a problem.

also, planks are great for back pain issues related to cycling.[/quote]

For a totally new setup, I agree. I was thinking about the wrong case - addressing new discomfort with an existing bike. I’m loath to mess with my saddle because I know pretty exactly what a good pedal stroke feels like, from hip flexors to ankles; changing it tends to set off a chain of problems.


#44934

[quote=motorbacon]Third Bay Area person chiming in.

The amount of blown up Enve’s I’ve dealt with in the last four months at the new shop is mind blowing, even with the ‘new’ brake surface. That stuff is hot garbage.

Reynolds and Zipps only, please.

3849 foot descent in 9 miles isn’t good for carbon rim brakes…[/quote]

3849 – Mt Diablo? I sure as hell don’t miss that climb.


#44935

[quote=iwillbe][quote=mander][quote=iwillbe][quote=eric_ssucks]So, think of your upper body as being cantilevered off your lower body. Reducing hand pressure is done by moving the saddle back and down a little. And maybe moving the bars forward and down.

Also, holy shit yoga, pilates, PiYo™, squats anything to build up core strength helps immensely.[/quote]

I’d mess with bar position long before I’d try to address upper body issues with saddle position.[/quote]

I respectfully disagree. Moving the saddle does the most with the body’s center of mass, and so imo is the place to start when weight is distributed where it isn’t wanted. I have found that moving my hands a cm or two has effects proportional to moving the saddle by millimeters.

so yeah, tilted back, lowered and moved back is a good idea if upper body has been a problem.

also, planks are great for back pain issues related to cycling.[/quote]

For a totally new setup, I agree. I was thinking about the wrong case - addressing new discomfort with an existing bike. I’m loath to mess with my saddle because I know pretty exactly what a good pedal stroke feels like, from hip flexors to ankles; changing it tends to set off a chain of problems.[/quote]
Clearly we’re a bunch of assholes on the internet with no idea what is right for you. Good luck finding something that works, and don’t overdo it right away.


#44936

I’m getting a clicking noise from the front brake on the Endpoint (Hayes CX mechanical) and there is a knocking when I grab the brake and rock front to back on the bars. I thought the headset might be loose, but the knocking goes away when I turn the bars 90º in either direction, so it doesn’t seem like that and I’m operating on the assumptions that the knocking is coming from the brake (but I can’t tell where/how) and that the knocking and the clicking are related. Braking seems to work fine, aside from the fact that I think I did a better job setting up the back brake.

I checked all the bolts on the flat to post adaptor, the bolts holding the caliper to the adaptor, the rotor bolts, the cable clampy guy and all were nice and tight. The fact that this is coming from the front brake and I’m using that huge Shimano flat to 160mm post adaptor make me a little nervous.

What am I forgetting?


#44937

Brake pad moving inside the caliper? (Spyres were quite bad with a sloppy fit, can’t recall how much slop there is in my Hayes) Floating rotor?


#44938

Rotor isn’t floating, but a brake pad moving inside the caliper seems like it would perfectly account for these things.

I would guess, then, that if I squeeze the lever hard enough, the clamping force would hold the pads in place hard enough that they’d stop knocking. I should test that tomorrow.

But if that’s true…what do I actually do about it?


#44939

earplugs?


#44940

Goddammit.