NJS racing in America

No, not NJS coming to America but track racing in a classes where only NJS parts and frames are allowed.
I think it would be cool and a nice way to even fields a bit along with the classes that already exist.

Does this already exist somewhere in the USA?

I thought about it today because ive been considering building a track bike. I mean one to race on a track.
Ive realized that the cheapest way for me to build a decent track racer would be to run NJS parts and a frame.
Ill probably do that anyway but I was just wondering about this kind of class.
Do any tracks have these sort of classes. I think it sounds fun.

LOL
Ben, I just realized where you got that face pic of me. It was baffling me big time.
Its when we went to Dizzyland, right?

dur.

[quote=“kyle!”][quote=“deathhare”]
The cheapest way for me to build a decent track racer would be to run NJS parts and a frame.
[/quote]

[/quote]

Im in Japan and come here a lot.
Honestly, NJS parts are really the cheapest way to go for decent parts. Unless you buy them in America, of course and then you get ripped off.
Im sure I could build some ultra cheap bike though on random cheap parts in the states too.

O

[/quote]

Oh fuck we’ve seen his face

Can it be that we finally get to see Death(hare)'s face??

Leveling the playing field is something I have been trying to do for some time with my races here in Richmond on our ghettodrome. I will tell you this…the parts really don’t make a difference. If they guy on the stock Bianchi Pista is a freaking horse it won’t matter if a weaker guy has a Dolan with Zipp wheels. I think the only real answer is gear restrictions. This is something I will be experimenting with in my races next year. We are adding a C race to the A and B and will most likely have a gear restriction of 46x15 or 49x16 to level things out a bit in the beginner class.

Yeah, I pretty regularly see guys with $1500 bikes get stomped by guys on inexpensive rental bikes. Certainly an ultra-stiff frame and aerodynamic wheels make a difference, but I don’t think it’s so pronounced that we need an NJS-style set of standards to ensure fairness.

I guess that makes sense. Same thing on the street eh?
I just thought it sounds fun.

Ahh shit. Now we all die?

After seeing it, can I just say, no wonder he kept that thing hidden for so long! Am I right?

But seriously you’re a beautiful man

The dude who cleans up at all the prize races in Atlanta rides a $600 Kazane frame. Plenty of dolans and such around, but he kills them all.

DH, don’t know of any classes like that in Amurrica. However, you’d be just fine racing a full NJS bike over here if you want. I personally don’t think one needs to worry much about the bike they’re riding until cat 2 or 3’s. Only thing is you may want to get some clipless pedals or slotted cleats for the MKS NJS peds.

His whole bike was MUCH more though.
Im not saying you cant beat expensive bikes on cheap bikes.
Im just talking about having fun and making some equipment rules that are not only interesting and limiting but also doesnt have people thinking about parts as much as their actual abilities and training.
You know there are plenty of people who REALLY want to make their bike lighter and stiffer by buying crazy money shit or disc wheels that cost more than a complete NJS bike.

you know what would really level the playing field? make everybody ride 25-pound gaspipe conversions with suicide hubs and stock cranks. last one to pedal strike wins.

[quote=“deathhare”]

Im in Japan and come here a lot.
Honestly, NJS parts are really the cheapest way to go for decent parts.
Unless you buy them in America, of course and then you get ripped off.
Im sure I could build some ultra cheap bike though on random cheap parts in the states too.[/quote]

http://www.pistoposeur.blogspot.com/

The thing is, there’s actually a really small market for the kind of high-end carbon track frames and components that you’re talking about. Most of the people you see out there with them didn’t pay full price for them, and the reason why they didn’t is because they’re good enough that they got hooked up. Since they’re that good, they’re probably pretty solid riders who benefit from the stiffness and light weight that this stuff provides.

Then again, even if you’re “hooked up” by Zipp, you’re still paying $1200 for a set of wheels.