Post pictures of your bike mess *NOT SAFE FOR ARTBLUR*


#501

[quote=Straws]I’ve read a fair bit about the attempts to come up with a system to deter future civilizations from digging in our nuclear waste. It’s such an interesting problem. Almost nothing will stop human curiosity, as we well know. I love that the best ideas are those creating a mythos concerning the waste.

In the end none of it will work and whatever civilization is here 10,000 years from now will hopefully be able to handle the wastes of our elementary attempt at controlling matter. We all know 12,000 AD is going to happen but to actually think about the people walking around digging holes at that point is something else entirely. I love it.[/quote]

Speculative archaeology! I read an article about this as a kid, it really messed with my sense of history. I knew that the pyramids and Ankgor Wat were old and stuff, but the idea that one day I’d be part of a long-vanished culture blew my mind. If memory serves, the article I read also suggested enormous pyramids covered in massive granite spikes and skulls. Unfortunately, that’s the international symbol for “dudes there’s totally some badass stuff down here!”


#502

[quote=The RTS]

Spent some time sorting thru some of my parts bins. What can I say - I like the Turbo.[/quote]
i approve of your workbench.


#503

there’s a set of tubular shamals in the corner of my bedroom that i should turn into a months’ rent that i’ve been dithering on.


#504

Sell em dude, fuck that shit.


#505

sell them then sell that 9sp ultegra stuff


#506

I spent a few hours yesterday cleaning and organizing my bike mess. I was shocked by how many stems I have when I put em all in one place! Kinda shocked by how many of everything, really.


Organizized:


#507

[quote=Rusty Piton]Holy shit! I found a picture of the thing being buried there!


Argonne history: Chicago Pile-3 Demolition by Argonne National Laboratory, on Flickr
And here it is in use!
Argonne history: Chicago Pile-3 Site A by Argonne National Laboratory, on Flickr
The history of the place makes riding there so much more fun!
So many stories must be attached to the bits of cinder block and brick that occasionally stick out of the trail![/quote]

Didn’t expect to run into this on Tarck. I love nuclear history. My dream is to teach a class in it someday. These pictures are so awesome.

Did you know it was Obama who killed the Yucca Mountain project, violating federal law in the process? I love the guy, but that sucked. All current nuclear waste from power generation is stored on-site at all 99 nuclear plants in the U.S. There’s no permanent repository (even though federal law mandates that we should already have three) and even the temporary ones have had serious issues.

I personally think that storing nuclear waste is a helluva lot more solveable than climate change/deleterious health effects from fossil fuel emissions. If we really wanted to figure it out and if it weren’t such a political burden, we’d have already done it. It would only take ~300-400 nuclear plants to cover all of the electricity use in the entire U.S.


#508

You guys will dig this: http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/local/2016/08/18/did-you-know-kodak-park-had-nuclear-reactor/88944080/


#509


#510

I like the organization Rusty!
I am too in the process of trying to get the bike room dialed since it’s practically in the kitchen of our new house and will be visible to visitors. I feel bad forcing my partner to look at it everyday so i’m hoping that motivates me to keep it clean and pleasing to the eye.
Its going to be really hard transitioning from a huge garage with a 20 foot work bench and infinite storage to a tiny room intended to be a dining room.

This was the preliminary workbench area but I’ve since cleared about 50% of the stuff so I can actually use the entire bench and park the stool underneath.

Found some smaller matching tubs to organize bike parts & bags I want to keep. Made a little caster cart so its easy to pull out without scratching up the floor:

Cycletruck Parking was the most difficult, this seems to be the most optimal way to store it and allow shoe rack.

Picked up some of these racks which I really like but …ugh… way too expensive. The hardware on them is really nice & allows you to store bikes in the most efficient way without putting holes in the walls:

We were gunna get rid of this book shelf when we shed 70% of our book collection but it fit the helmets, bags, locks, gloves + stuff pretty well so its being repurposed.


#511

finn is such a good model


#512

his and hers cable locks might be the cutest thing I’ve seen this calendar year


#513

pretty sure those are colormatched to his two different 650b bike / Giro outfit schemes


#514

I have Squirrel coordination envy.


#515

[quote=mdilthey][quote=Rusty Piton]Holy shit! I found a picture of the thing being buried there!


Argonne history: Chicago Pile-3 Demolition by Argonne National Laboratory, on Flickr
And here it is in use!
Argonne history: Chicago Pile-3 Site A by Argonne National Laboratory, on Flickr
The history of the place makes riding there so much more fun!
So many stories must be attached to the bits of cinder block and brick that occasionally stick out of the trail![/quote]

Didn’t expect to run into this on Tarck. I love nuclear history. My dream is to teach a class in it someday. These pictures are so awesome.

Did you know it was Obama who killed the Yucca Mountain project, violating federal law in the process? I love the guy, but that sucked. All current nuclear waste from power generation is stored on-site at all 99 nuclear plants in the U.S. There’s no permanent repository (even though federal law mandates that we should already have three) and even the temporary ones have had serious issues.

I personally think that storing nuclear waste is a helluva lot more solveable than climate change/deleterious health effects from fossil fuel emissions. If we really wanted to figure it out and if it weren’t such a political burden, we’d have already done it. It would only take ~300-400 nuclear plants to cover all of the electricity use in the entire U.S.[/quote]

I did some research on Yucca Mtn in my undergrad and, while it’s a pretty good long-term solution, there are some pretty hazardous seismic risks in the region.

The problem with nuclear waste is the extremely long holding times needed. When you store waste like that in a region that even has a remote risk of catastrophic earthquakes, you create a risk of a pretty bummer situation.

I then presented the alternative of burying our nuclear waste on the moon or in a subduction zone, but nobody took me seriously for some reason.


#516

Derek, how the hell would we get to the moon?!?


#517

If it’s already airborne, why not just fling it into the vastness of space? At even the most moderate speed, would it not be completely decayed by the time it reached anything? And more likely, won’t it just go on forever, until the death of the universe in 10^100 years?

What about engineering a bacteria to eat it and turn it into water? Is that some shit that’s possible?


#518

[quote=Wintage Townie]If it’s already airborne, why not just fling it into the vastness of space? At even the most moderate speed, would it not be completely decayed by the time it reached anything? And more likely, won’t it just go on forever, until the death of the universe in 10^100 years?

What about engineering a bacteria to eat it and turn it into water? Is that some shit that’s possible?[/quote]

There’s so much debris floating around in orbit right now that it’s becoming harder to keep satellites up there without them getting hit and destroyed. I can only imagine the shitshow if 2030’s astronauts have to dodge nuclear waste coming at them at 17,500 miles per hour.

As for the bacteria, they tried to do that with PCB’s (polychlorinated biphenyls, basically fireproof oil) and some of the molecules were too complex for the engineering involved. But, on some of it, it did work, like the PCB’s in the Hudson river.

Sadly, that doesn’t work on nuclear waste because you’re basically looking at heavier isotopes of Uranium. It’s already a base element and can’t be broken down any more. In order to turn it into water, you’d need to be a goddamn alchemist.


#519

What in the hell do you do, new guy? I wanna talk bioremediation with you.


#520

Clean coal!